What athletes think about steroids

As the number of high school students participating in athletics continues to increase, so will the number of sports-related concussions unless effective concussion prevention programs are developed. We sought to develop and validate a cost-effective tool to measure neck strength in a high school setting, conduct a feasibility study to determine if the developed tool could be reliably applied by certified athletic trainers (ATs) in a high school setting, and conduct a pilot study to determine if anthropometric measurements captured by ATs can predict concussion risk. In the study's first phase, 16 adult subjects underwent repeated neck strength testing by a group of five ATs to validate the developed hand-held tension scale, a cost effective alternative to a hand-held dynamometer. In the second phase, during the 2010 and 2011 academic years, ATs from 51 high schools in 25 states captured pre-season anthropometric measurements for 6,704 high school athletes in boys' and girls' soccer, basketball, and lacrosse, as well as reported concussion incidence and athletic exposure data. We found high correlations between neck strength measurements taken with the developed tool and a hand-held dynamometer and the measurements taken by five ATs. Smaller mean neck circumference, smaller mean neck to head circumference ratio, and weaker mean overall neck strength were significantly associated with concussion. Overall neck strength (p < ), gender (p < ), and sport (p = ) were significant predictors of concussions in unadjusted models. After adjusting for gender and sport, overall neck strength remained a significant predictor of concussion (p = ). For every one pound increase in neck strength, odds of concussion decreased by 5 % (OR = , 95 % CI -). We conclude that identifying differences in overall neck strength may be useful in developing a screening tool to determine which high school athletes are at higher risk of concussion. Once identified, these athletes could be targeted for concussion prevention programs.

Founded by Accredited Sports Dietitians and Accredited Practicing Dietitians, Zoë  Watt, Emilie Burgess and Rebecca Hay, The Athlete ’ s Kitchen is a practice specialising in high performance nutrition as well as meeting your everyday nutrition needs. Recognising that there is an athlete in everyone, the team at The Athlete ’ s Kitchen is focused on providing an evidence-based nutrition service to meet the needs of all individuals. With experience in clinical settings, private practice as well corporate and team environments, our dietitians will be able to assist.

Diet focus: I tend to eat the same thing daily for about two to four weeks, with a few indulgences here and there, leading up to competition. Food is fuel, so I typically focus on getting in as much of a variety of plant-based, whole foods as possible—the less processed, the better. For me, eating is about being mindful and intuitive to what the body needs, feels like, and (for some) what the body looks like. I monitor based on portion or serving size, but when I’m training someone, I do encourage counting calories and monitoring macros until they get a feel for and understanding of what works for their bodies. At the very least, I drink 1 gallon of water everyday, training day or not.

After my first meeting in the EA Council I recognized the difficulties and problems that our family has had the last years. Our sport is facing a lot of challenges. We must protect the athletes’ rights and efforts. Now is the time to have a clear information about the problems and the different projects regarding the future of our sport. We need to be part of the proposed solution for every challenge. Athletes’ Commission should lead and secure the next steps and with the correct communication have the best available feedback. That is why I am asking you to support my effort and vote for me for the IAAF Athletes’ Commission. I believe that with the help of the other existing members and in addition with the new fellow candidates we can lead together this new era of our sport.

What athletes think about steroids

what athletes think about steroids

After my first meeting in the EA Council I recognized the difficulties and problems that our family has had the last years. Our sport is facing a lot of challenges. We must protect the athletes’ rights and efforts. Now is the time to have a clear information about the problems and the different projects regarding the future of our sport. We need to be part of the proposed solution for every challenge. Athletes’ Commission should lead and secure the next steps and with the correct communication have the best available feedback. That is why I am asking you to support my effort and vote for me for the IAAF Athletes’ Commission. I believe that with the help of the other existing members and in addition with the new fellow candidates we can lead together this new era of our sport.

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